Category Archives: Historic Preservation

Greenwich Village: Past and Present


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453-461-sixth-avenue-in-the-historic-districtOn a bitterly cold January morning in 1917, the painters John Sloan and Marcel Duchamps, along with friends, climbed to the top of Washington Square Arch to proclaim the secession of Greenwich Village from the United States. Thenceforth the neighborhood that stood as America’s repository of avant-garde art, literature and social enlightenment would be known as the Free and Independent Republic of Washington Square. The stunt defined the character of the Village, as it is popularly known to New Yorkers, for the ensuing half century. Continue reading

Seward/Mapes Homestead Raises $9k For Preservation


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seward-mapes-homestead-restoration-committee-president-roger-dowd-presents-florida-mayor-james-pawliczek-with-a-check-towards-preserving-the-homesteadOn Thursday, December 14th, the Seward/Mapes Homestead Restoration Committee of Florida presented the Village of Florida’s governing Board with a $5,000 check toward the restoration of the Seward/Mapes Homestead. Added to a $4,000 contribution made earlier in 2016, the organization raised a total of $9,000 toward a New York State matching fund grant for historic preservation. Continue reading

Historic Huguenot Street Launching Sustainable Preservation Project


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Historic Huguenot Street Historic Huguenot Street (HHS) has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections Planning Grant for in the amount of $49,170.

The purpose of this federally-funded grant is to support a team of experts in collections preservation and environmental management to comprehensively review twelve historic structures at HHS. Over the course of several months, the consultants will visit the site and work closely with HHS’ staff, Board, and committee members to recommend sustainable improvements to these sensitive environments. Continue reading

Johanna Yaun: The New York History Community’s Next 100 Years


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ny-history-next-100-yearsI don’t want to let 2016 come to a close without marking an important commemoration in the history of historic preservation.

One hundred years ago, the Federal Government created the National Parks Service. During the official centennial celebration in August of this year, the Hudson Valley was honored to welcome the Secretary of Interior, Sally Jewell, to a roundtable discussion at the Bear Mountain Inn.  For the discussion, participants were asked to predict which trends would persist in the next 100 years of historic preservation and historic interpretation. With a new administration in the White House, a new Secretary of Interior will soon follow and the challenge to reach that person with the priorities of the historical profession will begin again. On a local level we face a continuing retraction of municipal resources for arts and cultural protection and programming as the burden is shifted to non-profits. My predictions are based on those concerns as well as the changes that I see in how technology is being used to reach the public. Continue reading

Preservation of Unique Long Island Schoolhouse Underway


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modern-times-schoolThe Brentwood Historical Society has made the preservation of the Modern Times School in Brentwood, Suffolk County, Long Island the primary mission of the group for the past five years.

In 2016, the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation awarded a grant in the amount of $72,290.00 for preservation, matching funds already raised by the historical society. The grant is expected to allow work to start. Continue reading

For Rent: Federal Hall National Monument


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National Park Service NPSNational Park Service, Manhattan Sites and the National Parks of New York Harbor Conservancy (Harbor Conservancy) announced that Federal Hall National Memorial is available to rent for special events.

Federal Hall National Monument is one of 413 units of the National Park Service. From 1789 to 1790, the location of Federal Hall National Memorial was the seat of the United States federal government under the new Constitution. Congress passed many of the founding laws of the nation and approved the Bill of Rights for ratification by the states. The 1883 statue of George Washington commemorates where our first president took the oath of office on April 30, 1789. Continue reading