Category Archives: Historic Preservation

Adirondack Preservation Award Nominations Sought


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Old Warren County Courthouse_ Lake GeorgeAdirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the historic preservation organization for the region, has opened nominations for its 2017 Preservation Awards. For over 20 years, these annual awards have recognized sensitive restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive reuse of historic structures, as well as individuals who have promoted historic preservation and community revitalization consistent with AARCH’s mission.

Projects of all sizes and scopes are eligible for consideration. The deadline for nominations is July 1, 2017. A celebration of the 2017 award winners will be on September 18, 2017, at a farm-to-table luncheon at the Nettle Meadow Farm, a 2016 AARCH Presevation Award recipient in the town of Thurman near Warrensburg. Continue reading

Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery Landmarks Get Makeover


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Miller Mausoleum The corporate team Kärcher, that cleaned Mt. Rushmore, the Seattle Space Needle and The London Eye, recently visited to Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn to give some of its famous monuments and mausoleums a special makeover.

Using cutting-edge and eco-friendly technology, cultural restoration expert Thorsten Moewes, of Kärcher, a manufacturer of cleaning equipment, removed centuries of dirt and grime from three Green-Wood landmarks free of charge: the Niblo Mausoleum (1851), the Miller Mausoleum (ca. 1870) and the Charlotte Canda Memorial (1845). Following the cleaning, a HDS 13/20 hot water pressure washer was donated to Green-Wood. Continue reading

Stone Conservation Field School Planned


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willowbank stone conservation schoolWillowbank has announced its Stone Conservation Field School at Sainte-Marie Among The Hurons National Historic Site (SMATH). This intensive three week summer school will be held from June 10th to June 30th, 2017.

This opportunity immerses participants in the ongoing conservation of Ontario’s first European masonry structures – a set of hearths dating from 1639 used by the Jesuit missionaries who settled and lived among the Huron/Wendat peoples. The hearths sit amongst the reconstructed and reimagined structures of a 17th century mission, which serves to interpret this early contact history. Continue reading

170 Acres Preserved At Saratoga Battlefield


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Saratoga National Historical Park finalized the acquisition of 170 acres of historically significant land in April, after 10 years of collaboration with the Open Space Institute (OSI). After a minor administrative boundary adjustment to the park in 2016, Saratoga successfully secured funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund to provide for the transfer of the property from OSI. Continue reading

Harlem Preservation Conference April 29th


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harlemOn Saturday, April 29, twelve community-based organizations will host a day-long forum titled “Harlem and the Future: Preserving Culture and Sustaining History in a Changing Environment” (“Harlem and the Future”) that will discuss the changes, the best practices, and the imminent challenges that are affecting Harlem’s social fabric, built environment, and cultural heritage. Harlem’s first historic preservation conference comes at a time of change to this iconic neighborhood.

The conference will begin at 9 am at the City College of New York Spitzer School of Architecture (141 Convent Avenue at 135th Street) and will last until 5 pm with a series of events staged throughout the day. Continue reading

Historical Collections Supplies Grants Available


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cnap supplies programGreater Hudson Heritage Network and New York Council on the Arts have announced the portal to apply for the first cycle of the new NYSCA/GHHN Collection Needs Assessment Program (CNAP) – Supplies Grant is now open. Applicants who have consulted with an appropriate professional may request funds to purchase collections management supplies. Supplies may include, but are not limited to: storage boxes, acid-free tissue paper, artifact trays, dividers, UV filtering film, Tyvek sheeting, tape, tags, labels, and environmental monitors, etc. Supply requests for archival or library collections will not be supported. Maximum award is $750. Continue reading

Eli Hasbrouck of Hasbrouck House (Part II)


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In 1850, after the State of New York took possession of the Hasbrouck House for back taxes. Eli Hasbrouck appeared in various publications directly related to his cultivation of grapes. He grew what he called the Anna Grape in his garden. It was prized as a variety because it was free from rot. Eli was drawn to the grape because of it color. A.J. Downing thought highly of it. It was said about the grape, “the raisins had the sweet rich flavor and aroma of those from the Muscat of Alexandria.”

Eli married again in 1855; the same year his brother Jonathan died. He married Margaret Van Wyck, of Fishkill, on February 13. The same time period he re-married, Eli was listed in the census as being worth $18,000. His occupation recorded as “gentleman.” Eli was in fact a merchant and farmer. Where Eli lived during this time was listed in business directories as 167 Liberty Street in Newburgh. In addition to his large family, his sister Mary also lived with the family until her death in 1856. Continue reading

Guide to NYC’s Art Deco Architectural Treasures Published


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Of all the world’s cities, perhaps none is so defined by its Art Deco architecture as New York. Anthony W. Robins’ new book New York Art Deco: A Guide to Gotham’s Jazz Age Architecture (SUNY Press, 2017) leads readers step-by-step past the monuments of the 1920s and 30s that recast New York as the world’s modern metropolis.

Robins’ new guide includes an introductory essay describing the Art Deco phenomenon, followed by eleven walking tour itineraries in Manhattan each accompanied by a map designed by New York cartographer John Tauranac and a survey of Deco sites across the four other boroughs. Also included is a photo gallery of sixteen color plates by Art Deco photographer Randy Juster. Continue reading

New Approaches for Historical Societies and History Museums


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Many of the posts in this New York History Blog report on new exhibits, public programs, outreach to schools, and other initiatives. This variety of initiatives reflects the fact that here in New York we have some of the most progressive, innovative programs in the nation.

But are there really any new ideas out there – new ways of looking at and carrying out our mission as historical societies, history museums, and other public history programs? Continue reading