Category Archives: Exhibits

Eldridge Street Synagogue Restoration in Photographs


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museum at eldridge streetThe Museum at Eldridge Street will open a new exhibition, “Rediscovery, Restoration & Renewal: The Eldridge Street Synagogue in Photographs,” on Thursday, September 14 from 6 to 8 pm with an opening reception.

Ten years ago, the restoration of the Eldridge Street Synagogue was completed. After a 20-year, $20 million effort, the building was brought back from the verge of collapse to stand once again as glorious as it had been when it opened in 1887.   Continue reading

Kinderhook ‘Electric Park’ Exhibition Now On Display


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the ferris wheel at Electric ParkThe ‘Electric Park’ exhibition at the Columbia County Historical Society (CCHS) is now open to the public.

The exhibit highlights the culture of Kinderhook Lake’s Electric Park, which operated between 1901 and 1920 in Columbia County, showcasing the phenomena dubbed by newspaper columnists as “postcarditis” – an obsession with sending and receiving postcards – featuring Electric Park postcards that offer poignant glimpses into daily lives of Columbia County residents and visitors during the early 1900s. Continue reading

New Exhibition Explores Albany Anti-Suffrage Movement


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anti suffrage pinAlbany Institute of History & Art has opened a new exhibition exploring Albany and Anti-Suffrage Movement.

The year 2017 marks the centennial of woman’s suffrage in New York State.

Albany was considered a stronghold of the anti-suffrage movement. The exhibit tells the story of the women who first met in 1894 before the New York Constitutional Convention convened, organized the Albany branch of the New York State Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, lobbied to make their views heard in 1915, and lost their fight in 1917. Continue reading

Dutch Culture Being Showcased at Historic Huguenot Street


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George Way surrounded by some of his collectionsHistoric Huguenot Street (HHS),  in New Paltz, Ulster County, NY will present Living in Style: Selections from the George Way Collection of Dutch Fine and Decorative Art, October 1 through December 17, 2017.

This installation of a period room in the historic Jean Hasbrouck House celebrates the enduring impact of Dutch culture and the New Netherland Colony in the Hudson Valley. A preview of the room will take place on Saturday, September 30 as part of HHS’s Fall Harvest Celebration. Continue reading

Realities of Resettlement: Refugees In Utica Exhibit


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A new exhibit at the Realities of ResettlementOneida County History Center, Realities of Resettlement explores refugee integration into urban life in Utica. The resettlement and integration of refugees affects the social, political, and economic fabric of the Mohawk Valley.

This exhibit offers an opportunity to learn from the city’s challenging and successful resettlement experiences in order to serve as a model for similar communities elsewhere.  Continue reading

‘Legacy of Lynching: Racial Terror in America’ Opens July 26


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Shirah Dedman, Phoebe Dedman, and Luz Myles visiting Shreveport, Louisiana, where in 1912 their relative Thomas Miles, Sr., was lynchedThe Brooklyn Museum, in partnership with the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) and Google,  are presenting the exhibition The Legacy of Lynching: Confronting Racial Terror in America.

On view from July 26 through September 3, the exhibition presents EJI’s research on the history of racial violence in the United States and its continuing impact on our nation to this day.

The exhibition will include video stories featuring descendants of lynching victims, a short documentary, photographs, an interactive map presenting EJI’s research, and informational videos. Continue reading

Suffrage Centennial Exhibit at Athens Cultural Center


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“White Louis XVI End Chair, Women’s Rights are Human Rights” by Laurel Garcia ColvinWomen won the right to vote in New York State in 1917, but the story really began much earlier and with particular fervor in the mid 19th century.

In the 1840’s, upstate New York was a hotbed of radicalism. The “Second Great Awakening” brought with it spiritual revivalism, penal and education reforms, abolitionism and the temperance and women’s right movements. This turbulent atmosphere of ideas and events was not unlike the cultural upheaval of the 1960s.

In 1848 Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Coffin Mott and several other women gathered around a tea table in Waterloo, New York and drafted the “Declaration of Sentiments” based upon the Declaration of Independence. By inserting into the text that women, as well as men, were created equal, they renewed the revolution that was started seventy two years earlier in 1776. The protracted and arduous road to women’s right to the elective franchise took until 1917 to be realized in New York State and not until 1920 in the entire United States. Continue reading

Sullivan County’s First World War Sacrifices


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Leonard Houghtaling from Neversink (on right) served overseas and fought in WWIJuly, 2017 is 100th anniversary of the first U.S. forces sent overseas to fight in World War I. The Time and the Valleys Museum in Grahamsville, NY will be honoring the men who fought in the war and the women who supported the troops by hosting a new exhibit and weekend of special programming on July 8th and 9th.

The new exhibit, A Rendezvous with Death: Local Sacrifice in the First World War highlights Sullivan County residents who participated in WWI. It includes photos, artifacts and little known facts and information about the war. The new exhibit can be viewed through Labor Day during Museum hours: Thursday through Sunday, noon to 4 pm and weekends in September. Continue reading

Exhibit: Freed Slave, New Paltz Landowner John Hasbrouck


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John Hasbrouck Account BookHistoric Huguenot Street has curated a new exhibit entitled John Hasbrouck, “A Most Estimable Citizen,” now on display at the DuBois Visitor Center, 81 Huguenot Street, through June 27, 2017.

John Hasbrouck was born to an enslaved woman in New Paltz in 1806 and, later, as a freeman, was able to purchase land in the town. He is commonly believed to be the first African American eligible to vote in New Paltz. The exhibit features original records; two account books in John’s own hand, listing work he did for white farmers and how he was compensated; as well as personal notes, letters, and receipts. The exhibit is accompanied by a full-length, biographical essay written by Josephine Bloodgood, Director of Curatorial and Preservation Affairs. Continue reading