Category Archives: Conferences

Conference: Uncommon Approaches to Common Core


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Commoon Core Conf_logoHow can educators meaningfully incorporate the wealth of local and regional cultural resources into our Common Core-based curricula?

The South Central New York State Regional Library Council is hosting a conference that hopes to  provide opportunities for public school teachers, librarians, administrators, local and regional museums, art centers, historic sites, and other cultural institutions to get to know and interact with each other over Common Core.  The keynote will be presented by Kate Gerson, Senior Fellow for Common Core and Educator Engagement for the NY State Department of Education. Continue reading

Fort Ticonderoga Material Culture Weekend Seminar


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Clothing MM 2011Fort Ticonderoga will present its Fourth Annual “Material Matters: It’s in the Details” Seminar the weekend of January 25 & 26, 2014. The weekend event focuses on the material culture of the 18th century and is intended for people with an interest in learning more about objects of the 18th century and what they can tell us about history.

“Material Matters” takes place in the Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center at Fort Ticonderoga and is open by pre-registration only. Continue reading

Call for Papers: Human Trafficking in Early America


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US_Slave_Free_1789-1861An interdisciplinary conference, Human Trafficking in Early America, will be held April 23-25, 2015 at the University of Pennsylvania. The Keynote Speaker will be Edward E. Baptist of Cornell University.

The United Nations defines “human trafficking” as the act of “recruiting, transporting, transferring, harboring or receiving a person through a use of force, coercion or other means, for the purpose of exploiting them.” In early America, human trafficking took many forms, engaging and displacing native, African and European populations in every decade and in every colony and state. Continue reading

Call for Proposals:
2014 Conference on New York State History


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Burr's Atlas (Published 1839, c 1829)The Conference on New York State History is seeking proposals for the 2014 conference to be held in Poughkeepsie, New York, at Marist College.

Presentations may consider any aspect and time period of New York State’s history. Conference sponsors are especially interested in proposals that highlight the role that partnerships among historical and cultural organizations can play in promoting better public understanding of New York State history. Continue reading

Call For Papers: Adirondack Land Use Symposium


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Stillwater7SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry’s Northern Forest Institute is inviting submissions for its third annual symposium of interdisciplinary scholarship in land use and ethics to be held in Newcomb June 6 – 8, 2014.

Submissions from a range of disciplines and professional fields are encouraged. Topics include a variety of approaches to land use, the moral implications of these approaches, and their impacts on social and environmental justice. See the 2013 program on their website. Submission deadline is December 16, 2013. More information can be found on their website.

19th Century Upstate New York Religions and Their Heirs


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american academy of religionThe Eastern International Region of the American Academy of Religion (EIR-AAR) is seeking proposals for papers and panels to be presented at the 2014 Eastern International Regional Meeting at Syracuse university, May 2-3, 2014. Alongside the regular panels, the conference will include a series of special sessions on the theme of 19th Century Upstate New York Religions and Their Heirs. The Submission Deadline is February 15, 2014. Continue reading

Researching New York Conference This Week


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Researching NY ConferenceThe Researching New York Conference is this week. The conference is being held Thursday and Friday, November 14-15, 2013 at the University at Albany. This is one of two major history conferences in New York State held each year. The New York History Blog will take part in the “History Showcase” in the Exhibit Area (Barnes & Noble Reading Room) between 3:15 – 4:OO PM on Thursday. Two free and open to the public talks will be featured on Thursday and Friday evenings.

A new speaker has been added for lunch on Friday. Clarence Taylor of Baruch College will discuss “Northern African-American Religious Communities and the Civil Rights Struggle of the Twentieth Century”. The complete conference program and attendence information, available through this link, includes more than 25 panels and featured events that examine a wide array of topics on New York State history including many responding to the conference theme, Religion in New York, by exploring how religion, religious practice, and expressions of spirituality are infused in the history of New York State. Continue reading

NY Social Studies Council Conference in Albany in March


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NYSCSS LogoIndividuals and organizations desiring to present programs at the annual conference of The New York State Council for the Social Studies and The New York Social Studies Supervisory Association at the Hilton in Albany on March 27-29 can now do so online.

The theme of this year’s confernce is Linking Communities Together: Academic, Civic and Cultural. In order to submit a proposal you will first need to become a member at a cost of $25 by clicking here. For each program delivered, presenters will receive $25 to cover personal expenses (travel, copying, etc.) related to program delivery. Continue reading

New Netherland Seminar Presentations Online


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800px-Vroom_Hendrick_Cornelisz_Battle_of_HaarlemmermeerThe presentation slides from all five presenters at the 36th New Netherland Seminar on October 5th are now available online. The seminar took on the question: What were the consequences of the 1568 revolt which began in the Low Countries against the Habsburg Empire and lasted 80 years? People were displaced – some fleeing the ravages of war; others were fleeing religious persecution. Continue reading

Researching New York Conference Details Now Online


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Researching NY ConferenceDetails for the upcoming Researching New York Conference are now available. The conference will be held Thurs.-Fri., November 15-16, 2013 at the University at Albany.

Featured events include a two talks. On Thursday evening Robert Orsi, author of The Madonna of 115th Street: Faith and Community in Italian Harlem, 1880-1950 (1985), will present “The Gods of Gotham: Religion and the Making of New York, 1800 to 1950″. On Friday afternoon Howard B. Rock, author of Haven of Liberty, New York Jews in the New World, 1654-1865 (2012), will present a talk entitled “A Momentous Encounter: Reform Judaism Challenges Orthodoxy in 19th Century New York.” Continue reading

CFP: James Fenimore Cooper and Politics


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James Fenimore CooperThe James Fenimore Cooper Society is seeking papers for a panel on James Fenimore Cooper and Politics at the 25rd Annual Conference of the American Literature Association, to be held in Washington DC at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill from May 22-25th, 2014.

Throughout his full range of writings, James Fenimore Cooper was a keen observer of national politics and government. The panel will consider issues of government, governance, and/or politics in Cooper’s fictional and non-fictional writings and/or Cooper’s own engagement with the political. Continue reading

National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum Inductions


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Abolition Hall of Fame 2The National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum (NAHOF) in Peterboro NY is finalizing its 2013 programs for the induction of four 19th Century abolitionists.

A program on each nominee will be presented for the Colgate University Upstate Institute Abolition Symposia on Saturday afternoon, October 19th at the Peterboro United Methodist Church, across the road from NAHOF at 5255 Pleasant Valley Road: Continue reading

A New Academic Conference at Jay Heritage Center


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constitution week 016This past September 18 – 20, in launching the first of what it hopes to be many academic conferences at its site, the Jay Heritage Center (JHC) faced a welcome challenge: to select a topic, a keynote speaker, and partner institutions sure to generate vigorous, enlightened and thought provoking discussions.

As a member site of NY’s Path Through History for its themes on Civil Rights and suitably inspired by our nation’s observation of Constitution Week each fall, JHC asked acclaimed scholar, author and Yale Law School Professor, Akhil Reed Amar to speak “On the Nature of Constitutions.” Continue reading

Harriet Tubman Symposium Planned in Auburn


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Harriet Tubman SymposiumOn November 8 and 9, 2013, Cayuga Community College in Auburn, NY will host “Harriet Tubman: No Longer Underground,” a two-day symposium marking the centennial of the death of Harriet Tubman in 1913.

Co-Sponsored by the Harriet Tubman Boosters Club, the Seward House Museum, and the Women’s Rights National Historical Park, the symposium will celebrate the life and work of the heroic African American woman who escaped slavery, conducted other slaves to freedom through the Underground Railroad, served the Union Army during the Civil War, and worked as a humanitarian and advocate for women’s rights throughout the 50 years she lived in Auburn. Continue reading

1568 Dutch Revolt Focus of 36th New Netherland Seminar


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800px-Vroom_Hendrick_Cornelisz_Battle_of_Haarlemmermeer What were the consequences of the 1568 revolt which began in the Low Countries against the Habsburg Empire and lasted 80 years? People were displaced – some fleeing the ravages of war; others were fleeing religious persecution.

A disconnect from the Empire meant a disruption in normal commercial activity. Markets and waters once friendly turned hostile. Trading companies eventually replaced the former commercial routes and exploration for new routes and markets was undertaken. On October 5th in New York City five Dutch and Belgian speakers will give illustrated lectures about the effects of this revolt on the Low Countries and the settlement of North America. Continue reading

History Community Coordination: An Update


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home_revolutionReaders of The New York History Blog may recall that in a previous post I asked if anyone had heard about what had been discussed in Cooperstown at the NYSHA conference in a private meeting involving the Association of Public Historians of New York State (APHNYS), the New York State historical Association (NYSHA), and the New York State Historian among others.

Some of those discussions have now been reported in the APHNYS newsletter. The following excerpts are from the newsletter. Continue reading

Place-Based Learning And Common Core Summer Institute


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Arnold WiltzAshokanDam1930CompressedEducators throughout the Hudson Valley are being invited to discover new and innovative ways to incorporate the region’s special places into their curriculum at Teaching the Hudson Valley’s 2013 institute, Place-Based Learning & Common Core. Registration is now open. The program will be held July 30-August 1 at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Home and Presidential Library in Hyde Park.

In a variety of workshops, field experiences, and talks, the institute will explore whether place-based learning techniques can help educators meet the demands of Common Core while continuing to focus on kids. Sessions will be led by local experts from throughout the Hudson Valley. Continue reading

NYS History Conference Features William Seward Talk


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seward bookWalter Stahr, the author of Seward: Lincoln’s Indispensable Man, speaks tomorrow June 7 in Cooperstown. His talk, the keynote address at the 2013 Conference on New York State History, begins at 7:30 pm in the Fenimore Art Museum Auditorium and is open to the public. The cost is $5.00.

William Seward, widely known for arranging the purchase of the Alaskan territory from Russia, was one of the most important Americans of the nineteenth century. He was a progressive governor of New York and an outspoken federal senator.  As secretary of state, he became Lincoln’s closest friend and adviser during the Civil War. He was also a target of the assassins who killed Lincoln. Continue reading