Category Archives: Books

NYC Lecture: Art Deco And Modern New York


By on

0 Comments

new york art deco bookThe Roosevelt Island Library will host historian and author Anthony W. Robins, who will give a lecture titled Art Deco Metropolis: Magnificent Buildings of Modern New York City, on Thursday, December 14 at 6:30 pm.

The Chrysler Building, the Waldorf-Astoria, and Rockefeller Center are among the hundreds of Art Deco monuments during the 1920s and ‘30s and that shaped the image of New York City as the world’s Modern Metropolis. Continue reading

Dunmore’s War NYC Lecture Set For Dec 7th


By on

0 Comments

dunmore's war bookThe Fraunces Tavern Museum in New York City will host a lecture on Dunmore’s War, presented by Glenn Williams, in their Flag Gallery on Thursday, December 7th at 6:30 pm.

Glenn Williams will talk about the causes, course, and conduct of the last Native American war before the American War for Independence.

This presentation will challenge many of the misconceptions and myths surrounding the 1774 conflict in which Lord Dunmore, Virginia’s last royal governor, led the colony’s forces in a defensive war against a Native American coalition led by the Shawnee Nation.  Continue reading

New Book Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial


By on

0 Comments

votes for women bookJennifer A. Lemak and Ashley Hopkins-Benton’s new book Votes For Women: Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial (Excelsior Editions, 2017) chronicles the history of the women’s rights and suffrage movements in New York State and examines the important role the state played in the national suffrage movement.

The work for women’s suffrage received a boost more than seventy years before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 when Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and one hundred supporters signed the Declaration of Sentiments asserting that “all men and women are created equal.”

This convention served as a catalyst for debates and action on both the national and state level, and on November 6, 1917, New York State passed the referendum for women’s suffrage. Its passing in New York signaled that the national passage of suffrage would soon follow. On August 18, 1920, “Votes for Women” were constitutionally granted. Continue reading

Benedict Arnold Lecture in Columbia County Nov 21


By on

0 Comments

benedict arnold bookAward-winning author David C. King is set to give a lecture and sign his new book, Benedict Arnold The Traitor Within on Tuesday, November 21 at 7 pm during a free event, open to the public, at the James Vanderpoel ‘House of History’ in Kinderhook, sponsored by the Columbia County Historical Society Volunteers.

Benedict Arnold is often regarded as an infamous traitor, but he was also one of the nation’s most talented military officers during the American Revolution.   Continue reading

North American Economy on the Eve of the Revolution


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldHow much merit do the economic factors behind the cry “No Taxation Without Representation” have when we consider the origins of the American Revolution?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we begin a 3-episode exploration of different aspects of the early American economy and what roles these economic aspects played in causing the American Revolution. Serena Zabin, a Professor of History at Carleton College and author of Dangerous Economies: Status and Commerce in Imperial New York (Penn Press, 2011), helps us survey the economic scene by guiding us through the British North American economy on the eve of the American Revolution. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/159

Continue reading

A Spirit of Sacrifice: New York State in the First World War


By on

0 Comments

a spirit of sacrificeA companion catalog to the New York State Museum exhibition of the same name, Aaron Noble’s new book A Spirit of Sacrifice: New York State in the First World War (SUNY Press, 2017) documents the statewide story of New York in World War I through the collections of the New York State Museum, Library, and Archives.

Within the collections are the nearly 3,600 posters of the Benjamin W. Arnold World War I Poster Collection at the New York State Library. The book interweaves the story of New York in the Great War with some of these posters, and artifacts from museums, libraries, and historical societies from across New York State, to illuminate the involvement of New Yorkers in the War. Continue reading

Russell Shorto At NYS Museum Monday, Nov 13


By on

0 Comments

revolution song bookAuthor and journalist Russell Shorto, whose new book, Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom, was released on November 7, will present a reading and discussion on Monday, November 13 at 7 pm in the Huxley Theatre, NYS Museum, Cultural Education Center, in Albany.

In Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom, author and historian Russell Shorto looks back to the founding of the American nation, drawing on diaries, letters and autobiographies to explore six lives, including an Albany man, that cast the era in a fresh new light. Continue reading

Citizen Soldier: Rev War Journal of Joseph Bloomfield


By on

0 Comments

citizen soldier bookOn Friday, November 10, 2017, the Fort Plain Museum is holding a book release signing and reception for Citizen Soldier: The Revolutionary War Journal of Joseph Bloomfield, edited by Mark Edward Lender and James Kirby Martin.

Bloomfield was an officer in the 3rd New Jersey Regiment from 1776 to 1779. His service took him from the Mohawk Valley (Guy Park Manor, Johnson Hall, Fort Dayton, Fort Stanwix and others) to Fort Ticonderoga in New York, to the battle of Brandywine in Pennsylvania, and to the battle of Monmouth in his native state. Also included are Bloomfield’s notes on the culture and behavior of the Iroquois tribes known collectively as the Six Nations, which played a crucial role in revolutionary New York. Continue reading

African American Soldiers of the American Revolution


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldBetween 1775 and 1783, an estimated 230,000 men served in the Continental Army with another approximately 145,000 men serving in state militia units.

But who were the men who served in these military ranks? What motivated them to take up arms and join the army? And what was their military experience like?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we begin a 2-episode exploration of some of the military aspects of the American Revolution by exploring the experiences of the approximately 6,000-7,000 African American men who served in the Continental Army. Our guide for this exploration is Judith Van Buskirk, a professor of history at the State University of New York, Cortland and the author of Standing in Their Own Light: African American Patriots in the American Revolution (University of Oklahoma Press, 2017). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/157

Continue reading

Two New Adirondack Historic Architecture Guides Published


By on

0 Comments

A Guide to Architecture in the AdirondacksTwo books published this year have significantly expanded our understanding of Adirondack architecture. People familiar with the Adirondacks know that twig furniture and palatial robber baron wilderness compounds are the exception, not the rule, for the Adirondack built environment. Unfortunately, until this year there have been no real resources that document the diversity of what really exists along the roadsides and in the settlements of the region. Now, at last, two truly amazing new books have arrived to fill the void. Both books belong in the bookcase of anyone who wants to know more about the Adirondacks.

Destined to become the reference book most often used to jog the memory is A Guide to Architecture in the Adirondacks by Prof. Richard Longstreth ($34.95, 427 pages). Published by Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) and produced by Adirondack Life this book covers the most significant buildings and structures throughout the region. Longstreth is a well-known architectural historian who teaches at George Washington University. He has deep first hand knowledge of the subject having been an inquiring seasonal resident of the Adirondacks since 1978. Continue reading