Author Archives: Liz Covart

Liz Covart

About Liz Covart

Liz Covart is the Digital Projects Editor at the Omohundro Institute at the College of William and Mary. She holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Davis. For more information about Liz and her podcast visit lizcovart.com.

The Martyr and the Traitor: Nathan Hale and Moses Dunbar


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In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, we explore answers to these questions about how and why Americans chose to support the sides they did during the American Revolution, by looking at the lives of two young soldiers from Connecticut: Moses Dunbar and Nathan Hale.

Taking us through the lives, politics, and decisions of these young men is Virginia DeJohn Anderson, a professor of history at the University of Colorado-Boulder and author of The Martyr and the Traitor: Nathan Hale, Moses Dunbar, and the American Revolution (Oxford Univ. Press, 2017). 
 You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/181

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Alexander Hamilton and the Making of American Law


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ben_franklins_worldIn this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Kate Elizabeth Brown, an Assistant Professor of History and Political Science at Huntington University in Indiana and author of Alexander Hamilton and the Development of American Law (Kansas Press, 2017), joins us to explore more about the Alexander Hamilton we don’t know, the Hamilton who helped develop American law. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/180

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Governance After the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldIn this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, George William Van Cleve, a researcher in law and history at the University of Seattle Law School and author of We Have Not A Government: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution (Univ. of Chicago Press, 2017), takes us into the Confederation period so we can discover more about the Articles of Confederation, the government it established, and the problems that government confronted. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/179

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Muslims & Moriscos in Colonial Spanish America


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ben_franklins_worldIn this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Karoline Cook, author of Forbidden Passages: Muslims and Moriscos in Colonial Spanish America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), serves as our guide as we explore some of the political, cultural, and religious history of New Spain. Specifically, how Spaniards and Spanish Americans used ideas about Muslims and a group of “new Christian” converts called Moriscos to define who could and should be able to settle and help the Spanish colonies in North America. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/178

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The Social Life of Maps in America


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Did you know that maps have social lives? Maps facilitate a lot of different social and political relationships between people and nations. And they did a lot of this work for Americans throughout the early American past.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Martin Brückner, a Professor of English at the University of Delaware, joins us to discuss early American maps and early American mapmaking with details from his book The Social Life of Maps in America, 1750-1860 (Omohundro Institute, 2017).
 You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/177

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The Value of Slaves from Womb to Grave


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What did it mean to be a person and to also be a commodity in early America?

We can’t really understand the history of early America unless we also grapple with the institution of slavery because the two were so intertwined.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast,  Daina Ramey Berry, an Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas, Austin and author of The Price For Their Pound of Flesh: The Value of the Enslaved, from Womb to Grave, in the Building of a Nation (Beacon Press, 2017), takes us behind the scenes of her research so we can explore how early Americans valued and commodified enslaved men, women, and children. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/176

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The Revolution in Ben Franklin’s House


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Just how personal was the American Revolution?

What could the event and war mean for individual people and families?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World; A Podcast About Early American History, Daniel Mark Epstein, author of The Loyal Son: The War in Ben Franklin’s House (Ballentine, 2017), guides as as we explore what the Revolution meant for Benjamin Franklin and his family and how the Revolution caused a major rift between Franklin and his beloved son, William. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/175

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Yellow Fever in the Early American Republic


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ben_franklins_worldIt’s February 2018 and doctors have declared this year’s seasonal flu epidemic as one of the worst to hit the United States in over a decade. Yet this flu epidemic is nothing compared to the yellow fever epidemics that struck the early American republic during the 1790s and early 1800s.

So what happened when epidemic diseases took hold in early America? How did early Americans deal with disease and illness?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Thomas Apel, author of Feverish Bodies, Enlightened Minds: Science and the Yellow Fever Controversy in the Early American Republic (Stanford University Press, 2016), has some answers for us. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/174

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Colonial Port Cities and Slavery


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ben_franklins_worldThe histories of early North America and the Caribbean are intimately intertwined. The same European empires we encounter in our study of early America also appear in the Caribbean. The colonies of these respective empires often traded goods, people, and ideas between each other.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Marisa Fuentes, an associate professor of history and women and gender studies at Rutgers University and author of Dispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), joins us to explore some of the connections mainland North America and the British Caribbean shared in their practices of slavery in urban towns. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/173

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Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War


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ben_franklins_worldIntelligence gathering plays an important role in the foreign policies of many modern-day nation states, including the United States. Which raises the questions: How and when did the United States establish its foreign intelligence service?

To answer those questions, in this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History we’ll journey back to the American Revolution.

Our guide is Kenneth Daigler, an intelligence professional with 33 years experience managing human sources and collection and the author of Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War (Georgetown university Press, 2014)will facilitate our mental time travel and exploration of this topic. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/172

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