Author Archives: Liz Covart

Liz Covart

About Liz Covart

Liz Covart is the Digital Projects Editor at the Omohundro Institute at the College of William and Mary. She holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Davis. For more information about Liz and her podcast visit lizcovart.com.

The American Revolution in North America


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ben_franklins_worldWhen we think about North America during the American Revolution, most of our brains show us images of eastern Canada and the thirteen British American colonies that waged a revolution and war for independence against Great Britain.

But what about the rest of the North American continent? What about the areas that we know today as the midwest, the Great Plains, the southwest, the west, and the Pacific Northwest? What about Alaska? What went on in these areas during the American Revolution?

What did the American Revolution look like through the eyes of Native American peoples?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we explore what the American Revolution looked like within the larger context of North American history with historians Claudio Saunt and Alyssa Mt. Pleasant. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/163

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Dunmore’s New World: British Empire and American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldWhat did British imperial officials in London and their North America-based representatives make of the American Revolution?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we explore the American Revolution through the eyes of John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, a British imperial official who served the empire in North America before, during, and after the American Revolution.

James Corbett David, author of Dunmore’s New World: The Extraordinary Life of a Royal Governor in Revolutionary America (University of Virginia Press, 2013), serves as our guide for this exploration. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/162

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Smuggling and the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldAt the end of the French and Indian, or Seven Years’ War in 1763, Great Britain claimed that smuggling was a BIG problem in its North American colonies and cracked down on the practice.

But just how BIG of a problem was smuggling in North America? Why did British North Americans choose to engage in the illegal importation of goods like tea? Was it really all about cheaper prices?

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Fabrício Prado, Christian Koot, and Wim Klooster join us to explore the history of smuggling in the eighteenth-century Atlantic World and to investigate the connections between smuggling and the American Revolution. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/161

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Politics of Tea During the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldHow did early Americans go from hosting social tea parties to hosting protests like the Boston Tea Party?

Tea played a central role in the economic, cultural, and political lives of early Americans. As such, tea came to serve as a powerful symbol of both early American culture and of the American Revolution.

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, Jane Merritt, Jennifer Anderson, and David Shields take us on an exploration of the politics of tea during the era of the American Revolution. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/160

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North American Economy on the Eve of the Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldHow much merit do the economic factors behind the cry “No Taxation Without Representation” have when we consider the origins of the American Revolution?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we begin a 3-episode exploration of different aspects of the early American economy and what roles these economic aspects played in causing the American Revolution. Serena Zabin, a Professor of History at Carleton College and author of Dangerous Economies: Status and Commerce in Imperial New York (Penn Press, 2011), helps us survey the economic scene by guiding us through the British North American economy on the eve of the American Revolution. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/159

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The Revolutionaries’ Army


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ben_franklins_worldBetween 1775 and 1783, an estimated 230,000 men served in the Continental Army with another approximately 145,000 men serving in state militia units.

Who were the men who served in these military ranks? What motivated them to take up arms and join the army? And what was their military experience like?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we explore the development of the Continental Army, partisan militia groups, and Native American scouting parties. Our guides for this exploration are Fred Anderson, Randy Flood, and Brooke Bauer. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/158

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African American Soldiers of the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldBetween 1775 and 1783, an estimated 230,000 men served in the Continental Army with another approximately 145,000 men serving in state militia units.

But who were the men who served in these military ranks? What motivated them to take up arms and join the army? And what was their military experience like?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we begin a 2-episode exploration of some of the military aspects of the American Revolution by exploring the experiences of the approximately 6,000-7,000 African American men who served in the Continental Army. Our guide for this exploration is Judith Van Buskirk, a professor of history at the State University of New York, Cortland and the author of Standing in Their Own Light: African American Patriots in the American Revolution (University of Oklahoma Press, 2017). You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/157

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The Power of the Press in the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldHow did Americans find out about the Revolution?

What effect did printed materials like newspapers, pamphlets, and books have on shaping the debate about independence? And just how big of a role did Thomas Paine’s Common Sense play in causing Americans to declare their independence from Great Britain?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we explore these question with four scholars of Revolutionary communication: Alyssa Zuercher Reichardt, Eric Slauter, Seth Cotlar, and Trish Loughran. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/156

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Pauline Maier’s American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldHow much can the work of one historian impact how we view and study the American Revolution?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we investigate the answer to this question by exploring the life and work of Pauline Maier, a historian who spent her life researching and investigating the American Revolution. Over the course of her lifetime, Maier wrote four important books about the American Revolution: From Resistance to Revolution (Knopf, 1973), The Old Revolutionaries (Knopf, 1980), American Scripture (Knopf, 1997), and Ratification (Simon & Schuster, 2010).

Mary Beth Norton, Joanne Freeman, Todd Estes, and Lindsay Chervinsky join us as we journey through Maier’s body of work to better understand the American Revolution and how one historian can impact how we view and study history. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/155

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Freedoms We Lost in the American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldDeclaring independence from Great Britain required the formation of new governments.

But why did Americans want and need new governments? And how did their interactions and experiences with their old, colonial governments inform their decisions to create new governments?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, Barbara Clark Smith, a curator in the division of political history at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the author of The Freedoms We Lost: Consent and Resistance in Revolutionary America (The New Press, 2010), leads us on an exploration of how Americans interacted with their government before the American Revolution and how the Revolution changed their interaction and ideas about government. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/154

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