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Editorial Staff

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Stories written under the Editorial Staff byline are drawn from press releases and other notices. Submit your news to The New York History Blog here.

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Hudson River School Painters Presentation In Hudson


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hudson river painting by sanford giffordThe Columbia County Historical Society and Historic Hudson will host The Hudson River School (1825-1875), a Slide Show and Conversation with Peter Jung on Sunday,  June 25, 2017. An opening reception will begin at 4:30 pm, the lecture will begin at 5 pm.

The mid-19th century landscape painters of the Hudson River Valley depicted the new American landscape in terms where humans and nature were united in peaceful co-existence. These realist paintings were quite detailed, and often combined many images from diverse natural scenes and vistas observed along the Hudson River as well as the extended geography including the Catskills and Adirondacks. Continue reading

Ham Radio Field Days at Chimney Point This Weekend


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amateur radio stationJune 24 and 25, 2017, is the annual Amateur Radio Service Field Days across the country. Members of the Addison County Amateur Radio Association will be at the Chimney Point State Historic Site in Addison on Saturday, from 1 to 5 pm, and Sunday, from 9:30 am to 2 pm. They will set up a simulated emergency station, and will invite visitors and talk about what they are doing.     Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Exhibit: Freed Slave, New Paltz Landowner John Hasbrouck


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John Hasbrouck Account BookHistoric Huguenot Street has curated a new exhibit entitled John Hasbrouck, “A Most Estimable Citizen,” now on display at the DuBois Visitor Center, 81 Huguenot Street, through June 27, 2017.

John Hasbrouck was born to an enslaved woman in New Paltz in 1806 and, later, as a freeman, was able to purchase land in the town. He is commonly believed to be the first African American eligible to vote in New Paltz. The exhibit features original records; two account books in John’s own hand, listing work he did for white farmers and how he was compensated; as well as personal notes, letters, and receipts. The exhibit is accompanied by a full-length, biographical essay written by Josephine Bloodgood, Director of Curatorial and Preservation Affairs. Continue reading

Kingston’s Part in World War I Noontime Conversation


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kingston in wwiPete Roberts, member of Friends of Historic Kingston (FHK), will host the last of three noontime conversations in the FHK gallery June 16.

The conversations will honor the centennial commemoration of World War I and Kingston’s part in it. Memorabilia from the FHK Archives, the William Anderson Carl Collection, and the Samuel Bernstein Collection are featured including photographs and related materials that depict Kingston’s role in 1917-1918. The American Legion (Post 150) made a special loan of the iconic artwork Columbia by Edwin Howland Blashfield (1919). Continue reading

New Play ‘Seneca Falls’ Debuting In Delaware County


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open eye theatreThe Open Eye Theater in Margaretville, Delaware County, NY, will celebrate the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in New York State with a new musical, Seneca Falls, to debut July 20th.

Written by Karen Howes, with music by Elliot Sokolov, the musical traces the beginnings of the Suffrage movement from 1848 to 1882.

Seneca Falls takes its name from the first Women’s Rights Convention which took place at that location, one hundred sixty-nine years ago, on July 18 and 19, 1848. Although New York State finally granted women the right to vote in 1917, women weren’t given voting status nationally until the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920. Continue reading

How the War of 1812 Truly Ended the American Revolution


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unshackling americaWillard Sterne Randall’s new book, Unshackling America: How the War of 1812 Truly Ended the American Revolution (St. Martin’s Press, 2017) challenges the notion that Americans fought two separate wars of independence.

Willard Sterne Randall documents a fifty-year-long struggle for economic independence from Britain overlapping two armed conflicts linked by an unacknowledged global struggle. Randall  argues that the struggle was all about free trade. Continue reading