Author Archives: Editorial Staff

This Week’s Top New York History News


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Latest New York History News

Subscribe! More than 9,200 people follow The New York History Blog via E-mail, RSS, or Twitter or Facebook updates.

Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please make a small donation. Questions about contributions should be directed to editor John Warren.

Hanford Mills Museum Kicks Off 42nd Season


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mill with steamHanford Mills Museum, in Delaware County, NY, will be open Wednesdays-Sundays, plus holiday Mondays, 10 am – 5 pm through October 15th. Guided tours are offered of the Mill complex, where visitors can watch the 1926 Fitz overshot waterwheel start up and provide the power for the sawmill and woodworking shop. Historic water-powered machines are operated each day, just as they were a century ago. Continue reading

Schenectady Celtic Heritage Day June 6th


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Schenectady Celtic Heritage DayThe Sixth Annual Schenectady Celtic Heritage Day, presented by a partnership of the Schenectady County Historical Society and the Schenectady Ancient Order of Hibernians, will be held at the Mabee Farm Historic Site in Rotterdam Junction on June 6, 2015 from 11 am to 7 pm.

This year’s event brings live music from regional Celtic favorite Triskele, as well as Dublin Train Wreck, and the Fiddler’s Tour plus Celtic dance performances by the Braemor Highland Dancers and the Farrell School of Irish Dance. Continue reading

Orange County Civil War Talk Wednesday


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gettysburgWilliam E. Mapes, a native of Florida, New York, volunteered in the summer of 1862 to save the Union. In this he was no different from any of the 300,000 men who signed up to fight in a war they had expected to be already over. President Lincoln and the loyal governors of the North called upon the eligible male population to enlist before conscription began. If they did so, they could serve with friends and neighbors in a regiment commanded by men they had known most of their lives. Continue reading

On Memorial Day Help Protect Fishkill’s American Revolution Cemetery


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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOn Memorial Day the New York History Blog encourages you to take a moment to support Friends of the Fishkill Supply Depot who are working to protect 10.4 acres that include an abandoned American Revolutionary War Soldiers’ Cemetery from commercial development.

In late 2007, an archaeological team rediscovered the cemetery on privately-owned land just south of the Van Wyck Homestead along U.S. Route 9 in Fishkill.  Fishkill served as the Patriots’ principal supply depot throughout the American Revolution, providing troops with supplies, weapons, ammunitions, transport, and food from 1776-1783.  The majority of the original 70-acre site has already been lost to commercial and transportation development. The Van Wyck Homestead served as the headquarters for what was George Washington’s principal supply depot during the Revolutionary War and is the site’s only remaining structure. Continue reading

This Week’s Top New York History News


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Latest New York History News

Subscribe! More than 8,700 people follow The New York History Blog via E-mail, RSS, or Twitter or Facebook updates.

Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please make a small donation. Questions about contributions should be directed to editor John Warren.

Modern Ruin: A World’s Fair Pavilion


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modern ruinA film screening of “Modern Ruin: A World’s Fair Pavilion,” Matthew Silva’s documentary about an abandoned structure designed by modernist icon Philip Johnson for the 1964 World’s Fair.The film tells the story of the Pavilion from the glory days of the fair, through the years of neglect, up to present day advocacy.

The filmmakers hope this project will be the first step in engaging and informing people about the building in new and exciting ways. This whimsical, futuristic, and soaring structure, constructed for the 1964 World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, has been left abandoned for the greater part of 50 years. Continue reading

Adirondack Museum Reopens Friday


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Adirondack MuseumThe Adirondack Museum opens for its 58th season on Friday, May 22, with new exhibitions, programs, family activities, and events.

The museum invites year-round residents of the Adirondack Park to visit free of charge every Sunday during the open season, and every day the museum is open in May and October. (Proof of year-round residency – such as a driver’s license, passport, or voter registration card – is required). Continue reading

New York Archives Conference June 3-5


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archives 2The 2015 New York Archives Conference (NYAC) will take place on June 3-5, 2015 at SUNY Fredonia, in Fredonia, New York.

The New York Archives Conference is an organization that once a year brings together archivists, manuscript curators, local historians and local government record keepers to discuss issues of mutual concern to professional holders of historical records. It is also an opportunity for individuals new to the profession to learn from colleagues and to become involved in professional activities. Continue reading

Headwaters History Days: 16 Sites, 2 Watersheds


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Rox historian Anthony Liberatore shows clockworks 2014 HHDHeadwaters History Days, two full weekends of events, exhibits, open houses and activities celebrating the history, culture, folklife and landscape of the Central Catskills, will be held May 30 and 31, and again June 6 and 7.

Visitors are invited to explore 16 historic sites across two counties, through the East Branch Delaware River and Esopus Creek Watersheds from Andes in Delaware County to Olive in Ulster County. Continue reading

Manhattan Plans Hermione Welcome, July 4th Festival


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hermoine leaving franceThe Lower Manhattan Historical Society (LMHS), in conjunction with the Bowling Green Association, the Sons Of the Revolution of the State of New York, the Sons of the American Revolution and Culture Now, has announced expanded historical activities in Lower Manhattan for the July 4, 2015 weekend.

On July 1, the Hermione, the full life replica of the ship which the Marquis de Lafayette sailed in 1780 to help save the American Revolution, will arrive at Pier 16 of the South Street Seaport in Lower Manhattan as part of its voyage to cities on the Eastern Seaport. Continue reading

David McCullough Receiving Archives and History Award


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David McCullough speaking at Emory University on April 25 2007Pulitzer Prize-winning author David McCullough will receive the 2015 Empire State Archives and History Award from the New York State Archives Partnership Trust at a public program on Wednesday, June 3, 2015 at 7:30 pm.

The public is invited to hear McCullough, with prominent Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer moderating, talk about his career as a writer, historian, lecturer and narrator. Continue reading

A Revolutionary War Cemetery Reveals More Secrets


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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAn historical researcher studying the pension files of Revolutionary War veterans has identified a Maryland officer who died at the Fishkill Supply Depot and was buried in a long-abandoned Revolutionary War cemetery threatened by development.

In late 2007, an archaeological team rediscovered the cemetery on privately-owned land just south of the Van Wyck Homestead along U.S. Route 9. The Van Wyck Homestead served as the headquarters for what was George Washington’s principal supply depot during the Revolutionary War and is the site’s only remaining structure. Continue reading

Spotlight: Sodus Bay Lighthouse Museum


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Sodus Bay LighthouseThe Sodus Bay Lighthouse Museum, located at 7606 North Ontario Street in Sodus Point, Wayne County, New York, has opened for its 31st season.

Built in 1870, the lighthouse was used to guide ships on Lake Ontario to safe harbor in Sodus Bay.  Use of the light was discontinued in 1901, having been made redundant by an outer light on the bay’s west pier.  The building now houses a museum, operated by the Sodus Bay Historical Society.  Exhibitions focus on local and maritime history and include displays about lighthouse keepers’ tools, railroads and trolleys, the Erie Canal, and the War of 1812.   Continue reading