Author Archives: Editorial Staff

Historic Huguenot St Appoints Advisory Board


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Historic Huguenot StreetHistoric Huguenot Street has announced that eleven historians have chosen to be part of its newly formed Scholarly Advisory Board. It’s expected that they will guide the interpretation of the National Historic Landmark District. The board is chaired by Dr. L.H. Roper, Professor of History at SUNY New Paltz.

The eleven historians share a knowledge for American, French, Dutch, Native American, New York, Atlantic, and Huguenot history – all of which are a part of the Historic Huguenot Street’s story. Continue reading

Remembering Inez: The Last Campaign


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Inez Milholland BookRemembering Inez: The Last Campaign of Inez Milholland, Suffrage Martyr (American Graphic Press, 2015), edited by Robert P. J. Cooney, Jr. , honors a prominent New York attorney and woman suffrage leader who died of pernicious anemia at age 30 while campaigning for votes for women.

The book includes intimate first-person accounts, stirring speeches, and heartfelt memorials that appeared in 1916 issues of The Suffragist, the weekly publication of the National Woman’s Party in Washington D.C. Continue reading

New Book On The Life Of Fanny Seward


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fanny-sewardOn April 14, 1865, the night of President Lincoln’s assassination, Booth’s conspirator Lewis Powell attempted to assassinate Secretary of State William Seward in his home just blocks from Ford’s Theatre.

The attack, which left Seward and his son seriously wounded, is recounted in poignant detail in Fanny Seward’s diary. Fanny, the beloved only daughter of Seward, was a keen observer, and her diary entries from 1858 to 1866 are the foundation of Trudy Krisher’s Fanny Seward: A LIfe (Syracuse Univ. Press, 2014), a vivid portrait of the young girl who was an eyewitness to one of the most tumultuous periods in American history. Continue reading

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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This Week’s Top New York History News


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Latest New York History News

Subscribe! More than 8,700 people follow The New York History Blog via E-mail, RSS, or Twitter or Facebook updates.

Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please make a small donation. Questions about contributions should be directed to editor John Warren.

NYS Arts Council Awards $36 Million


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nysca logoThe New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) has announced it has awarded $36 million in 1,899 grants to 1,242 New York State non-profit organizations to supports arts, culture and heritage organizations in New York State.

NYSCA awards grants in 16 program areas representing a cross-section of artistic disciplines and funding goals. Across the disciplines, grants support arts, culture and heritage programming; organizational operations; individual artists’ projects; additional granting opportunities, known as ‘regrants’ and services to the field. The agency also administers $674,000 in federal grant funding provided by the National Endowment for the Arts. Continue reading

Baseball Exhibits Opening At Albany Institute


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image034Opening day comes early to the Capital Region as the Albany Institute of History & Art presents Triple Play! Baseball at the Albany Institute, three exhibitions celebrating the history of baseball.

The exhibits include nationally and regionally significant materials, such as photographs, signed bats and balls, stadium seats, trophies, pennants, jerseys, and more. In addition, there is a roster of related events with guest speakers, family activity days, creative contests, and free admission opportunities. Continue reading

The Invisible Irish of the 19th Century


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Irish Servant Dressing WomanThey were neither to be seen nor heard as they served some of the great houses of Westchester County more than a century ago. But come February, the Anne Hutchinson-Bronxville Chapter National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) will uncover their forgotten stories in a lecture hosted by the chapter entitled, “The Invisible Irish of the 19th Century.”

The talk, which is free and open to the public, will be given by Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum Docent and writer Doug Hearle on Saturday, February 7th at 1 pm in the Yeager Community Room at the Bronxville Public Library.  Continue reading

Cayuga Museum Presenting Writers Event


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Cayuga MuseumThe Cayuga Museum, in Auburn, is beginning a new monthly program.  Called simply word., the new event will debut on Thursday, February 19 at 7 pm in Theater Mack.  Writers can share their original work with the audience – poems, short stories, essays, segments of larger work, the spoken word, or more.  Poetry, fiction or non-fiction, read or recited, word. is meant to celebrate the writer’s art and help local writers find their voice.   Continue reading

Historic Huguenot Street Lecture Series Set


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HHSHistoric Huguenot Street has announced its first events of the new year: a three-part lecture series with Ulster County Historian Anne Gordon. The lecture series will kick off on Saturday, February 7, at 4 pm.

In honor of Black History Month, this first lecture – entitled “From Isabella to Sojourner: A Slave in Ulster County” – will focus on the life of local abolitionist hero Sojourner Truth, from a childhood in slavery to her bold step into freedom. Continue reading

Brooklyn Museum Plans New Entryway Experience


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unnamed(35)The Brooklyn-based design firm SITU Studio has been selected by the Brooklyn Museum to create a new environment in the entry Pavilion and Lobby to transform the Museum’s entry. Taking a cue from retail and the hospitality sector, the new SITU-designed entry experience will focus on an assemblage of reconfigurable modular furniture designed to connect staff with visitors, while improving traffic and way-finding. Continue reading

New Expanded Edition Of ‘Capitol Story’ Published


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Albany Capitol StoryOften celebrated as a masterpiece of civic architecture and decorative design, the New York State Capitol sits majestically at the head of Albany’s State Street. The story behind the most expensive capitol building ever to be constructed is a fascinating one.

Built between 1867 and 1899, the Capitol was the work of four different architects, who each worked under exasperating conditions – geological, structural, and political – with hundreds of highly skilled masons and exceptional stone carvers. After completion, the building attracted controversy – seen by some as an atrocity of jumbled architecture and by others as a successful blending of architectural forms. Continue reading

Dolph Schayes And The Rise Of Professional Basketball


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Dolph Schayes and the Rise of Professional BasketballIn Dolph Schayes and the Rise of Professional Basketball (Syracuse Univ. Press, 2014), Dolph Grundman presents readers with a portrait, the first of its kind, of the star of the Syracuse Nationals basketball team during the 1950s and 1960s.

Dolph Schayes may not have one of the most recognizable names in basketball history, but his accomplishments are staggering. He was named one of the fifty greatest players of all time by the NBA, and he held six NBA records, including one for career scoring, at his retirement. Continue reading

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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Continue reading

This Week’s Top New York History News


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Latest New York History News

Subscribe! More than 8,700 people follow The New York History Blog via E-mail, RSS, or Twitter or Facebook updates.

Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please make a small donation. Questions about contributions should be directed to editor John Warren.

2015 Museums Conference Keynote Speakers Set


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MANY LogoThe Museum Association of New York (MANY) has announced the keynote speakers for the 2015 Museums in Action Conference, being held in Corning, NY from Sunday, April 12th to Tuesday, April 14th.

The 2015 conference theme is “Museums Mean Business”. Locally, statewide and across the country, museums help drive the economy. The scope of their impact is varied and wide, and includes audiences from all ranges of income and education. Tourists, local community members and school children are only a few of the groups that frequent museums on a daily basis. Each year nationally, more people visit museums than attend all professional sporting events and theme parks combined! Museums provide jobs, education and community spaces, and are a major attraction for tourism dollars. Continue reading

Thomas Cole Site Hosting Volunteer Info Open House


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Thomas-cole-houseThe Thomas Cole National Historic Site is opening its doors for an Information Open House on Sunday, February 15 at 12:30 pm for a one-hour program for all those interested in volunteering as a tour guide.

The Thomas Cole National Historic Site, located in Catskill, New York, is currently seeking volunteers to conduct tours of the house and studio. The organization is also recruiting Art Trail guides for their popular hiking program on the Hudson River School Art Trail where the views in 19th-century landscape paintings can be seen today in the Catskill Mountains. Volunteers are also needed for gardening and helping out at events. Continue reading