Author Archives: Editorial Staff

Historical Dictionary of Slavery and Abolition


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Dictionary of Slavery and AbolitionSlavery’s origins lie far back in the mists of prehistoric times and have spanned the globe, two facts that most history texts fail to address.

A comprehensive 2nd Edition of Martin A. Klein’s Historical Dictionary of Slavery and Abolition (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014) provides a historical overview of slavery through the ages, from prehistoric times to the modern day, while detailing the different forms, the various sources, and the circumstances existing in different countries and regions. Continue reading

The Culinary Lives of John and Abigail Adams


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Culinary Lives of John and Abigail AdamsThroughout their 54-year marriage, John and Abigail Adams enjoyed hearty, diverse cuisine in their native Massachusetts, as well as in New York, Philadelphia, and Europe. Raised with traditional New England palates, they feasted on cod, roast turkey, mince pie, and plum pudding.

These recipes, as well as dishes from published cookbooks settlers brought from the Old World, such as roast duck, Strawberry Fool, and Whipt Syllabub, are included in this new historical cookbook by Rosana Y. Wan, The Culinary Lives of John and Abigail Adams: A Cookbook (Schiffer, 2014). Continue reading

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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This Week’s Top New York History News


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Latest New York History News

Subscribe! More than 8,200 people follow The New York History Blog via E-mail, RSS, or Twitter or Facebook updates.

Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please make a small donation. Questions about contributions should be directed to editor John Warren.

Twelfth Night Celebration at Crailo Historic Site


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0104141631aTwelfth Night was one of the traditional holidays celebrated by the Dutch and English colonists of early New York.  Twelfth Night was the final holiday of the season and was marked with unsurpassed feasting and revelry.

On Saturday January 10, 2015 Crailo State Historic Site in Rensselaer, NY, will welcome visitors for its annual Twelfth Night Celebration from 4 until 7 pm. Continue reading

Museum Launches LGBT Stories Collecting Project


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Gay rights leader and journalist Clark Polak distributing leaflets during a sit-in in 1965The National Museum of American Jewish History (NMAJH) in Philadelphia is launching “LGBT Stories: A Collecting Project,” a new website that focuses on Jewish Americans in the barrier-breaking movement for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender rights during the twentieth century and beyond.

“The courageous story of the LGBT civil rights movement is a vital part of America’s ongoing search for freedom and NMAJH is proud to celebrate and share this history – with the public’s active participation,” says Ivy Barsky, the Museum’s Chief Executive Officer and Gwen Goodman Director. Continue reading

Nominations Sought for 2015 Preservation Awards


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An apartment at Academy Lofts in AlbanyThe Preservation League of New York State is seeking nominations for its 2015 Excellence in Historic Preservation Awards, which recognize significant achievements in historic preservation throughout New York State.

The League especially encourages nominations that may provide case studies or models incorporating energy efficiency, adaptive reuse, or New York’s Rehabilitation Tax Credit program. Continue reading

Fifty Years in Sing Sing: A Personal Account


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50 Years in Sing Sing PrisonWritten more than eighty years ago, Fifty Years in Sing Sing: A Personal Account, 1879-1929 (SUNY Press, February, 2015) is the personal account of Alfred Conyes (1852–1931), who worked as a prison guard and then keeper at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, New York, from 1879 to 1929.

This unpublished memoir, dated 1930, was found among his granddaughter’s estate by his great-granddaughter Penelope Kay Jarrett. Continue reading

Adirondack Wilds: Haunts of Noah John Rondeau


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ADK Wilds for JohnAuthor William J. “Jay” O’Hern has once again shown himself to be a tireless researcher. While letters, journals and old newspapers and magazines are valuable to his work, Jay favors a more hands-on approach. A seasoned Adirondack adventurer himself, he has always preferred interviewing people with knowledge of his subjects. He likes to visit the places he writes about.

So it was that he and his wife Bette backpacked to the Cold River Valley for a trip that provides the framework for Adirondack Wilds: Exploring the Haunts of Noah John Rondeau (2014). Jay serves as a guide to who followed the same trails decades before. Continue reading

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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Continue reading

This Week’s Top New York History News


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Latest New York History News

Subscribe! More than 8,200 people follow The New York History Blog via E-mail, RSS, or Twitter or Facebook updates.

Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please make a small donation. Questions about contributions should be directed to editor John Warren.

‘Cabin Fever Sundays’ At Adirondack Museum


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AdirondackMuseum-CabinFeverSundays_Lighthouse-LakeChamplainFrom North Creek to Blue Mountain Lake to Glens Falls, this winter the Adirondack Museum’s “Cabin Fever Sundays” series is presenting a wide-ranging look at life in the Adirondacks – yesterday, today, and tomorrow.

In the first installment of the series, author and photographer David E. Cook will take the audience on an exploration of approximately 80 – 85 light towers that have marked the waters inside the current boundaries of the Adirondack Park, dating back to around 1815. Continue reading

NJ Historical Commission Seeks Prize Nominations


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NJ Historical CommissionThe New Jersey Historical Commission is now accepting nominations for the Mildred Barry Garvin Prize, an annual award given to a New Jersey teacher, guidance counselor, or school librarian for outstanding teaching of African American history at an grade level between kindergarten and high school.

The prize ($1,500) is also awarded to individuals demonstrating outstanding performance in a related activity such as developing curriculum materials. Continue reading

Thomas Cole Site 2015 ‘Sunday Salon’ Preview


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NOZKOWSKI_Untitled_9-25_ Sams PointTo begin their second decade of “Sunday Salons”, Thomas Cole National Historic Site’s 2015 schedule will focus on connections to the immediate present, in conjunction with the exhibition, River Crossings: Contemporary Art Comes Home, that opens in May 2015 at both the Thomas Cole site and Olana.

Sunday Salons feature wine, cheese and mind-opening presentations once per month on Sundays at 2 pm. Tickets are $9 per person or $7 for members of either the Thomas Cole site or Olana. Tickets can be obtained online or at the door. Continue reading

NYS Museum Opens Native American Art Exhibit


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Waterman Man with GustowetsThe New York State Museum has opened a new exhibition featuring contemporary Native American artwork. “Represent: Contemporary Native American Art” features twenty-one artworks created by eighteen artists from Native American Nations in New York State.

On display through September 20, 2015, the exhibition features a variety of contemporary Native American artwork. From baskets and beadwork to modern art, the artwork celebrates the traditional roots of Native American artistry through modern expression. Continue reading