Author Archives: Editorial Staff

Dolph Schayes And The Rise Of Professional Basketball


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Dolph Schayes and the Rise of Professional BasketballIn Dolph Schayes and the Rise of Professional Basketball (Syracuse Univ. Press, 2014), Dolph Grundman presents readers with a portrait, the first of its kind, of the star of the Syracuse Nationals basketball team during the 1950s and 1960s.

Dolph Schayes may not have one of the most recognizable names in basketball history, but his accomplishments are staggering. He was named one of the fifty greatest players of all time by the NBA, and he held six NBA records, including one for career scoring, at his retirement. Continue reading

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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This Week’s Top New York History News


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Latest New York History News

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Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please make a small donation. Questions about contributions should be directed to editor John Warren.

2015 Museums Conference Keynote Speakers Set


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MANY LogoThe Museum Association of New York (MANY) has announced the keynote speakers for the 2015 Museums in Action Conference, being held in Corning, NY from Sunday, April 12th to Tuesday, April 14th.

The 2015 conference theme is “Museums Mean Business”. Locally, statewide and across the country, museums help drive the economy. The scope of their impact is varied and wide, and includes audiences from all ranges of income and education. Tourists, local community members and school children are only a few of the groups that frequent museums on a daily basis. Each year nationally, more people visit museums than attend all professional sporting events and theme parks combined! Museums provide jobs, education and community spaces, and are a major attraction for tourism dollars. Continue reading

Thomas Cole Site Hosting Volunteer Info Open House


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Thomas-cole-houseThe Thomas Cole National Historic Site is opening its doors for an Information Open House on Sunday, February 15 at 12:30 pm for a one-hour program for all those interested in volunteering as a tour guide.

The Thomas Cole National Historic Site, located in Catskill, New York, is currently seeking volunteers to conduct tours of the house and studio. The organization is also recruiting Art Trail guides for their popular hiking program on the Hudson River School Art Trail where the views in 19th-century landscape paintings can be seen today in the Catskill Mountains. Volunteers are also needed for gardening and helping out at events. Continue reading

Everything is Design: Paul Rand Exhibit in NYC


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Paul-RandThe Museum of the City of New York has announced a new exhibit opening in February, Everything is Design: The Work of Paul Rand, showcasing the nearly six-decade career of visionary American graphic design master Paul Rand (1914-1996).

Born in Brooklyn with a father who owned a small grocery store, Rand rose to the heights of 20th century design, seen as one of the most influential designers in the history of print and often called the ‘Picasso of graphic design.’  Continue reading

Saratoga Automobile Museum’s Spring Auto Show


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Saratoga Auto Museum Spring Auto ShowThe Saratoga Automobile Museum’s (SAM) longstanding Spring Auto Show and Saratoga Invitational, the traditional kickoff of the region’s auto show season, have undergone a slight format change for 2015.

This year’s fundraiser for SAM’s Distracted Driving educational program, which has a primary focus of educating both teens and adults on the dangers of texting while driving, cell phone use and generally not focusing on safe driving, is set for Saturday, May 16 from 10 am-4 pm with a Sunday rain date. It will no longer include the Saratoga Invitational as a separate entity but will still feature world class automobiles. Continue reading

Conference: American Revolution in the Mohawk Valley


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mohawk_river_valley_1775The Fort Plain Museum will host an American Revolution in the Mohawk Valley Conference, May 1 through 3, 2015 at the Museum. Almost 100 battles of the American Revolution were fought in New York State, including, in the Mohawk Vally, the Battle of Oriskany and defense of Fort Stanwix.

A series of raids against valley residents took place during the war. Led by John Johnson, they are collectively known as the “Burning of the Valleys”. Presenters for this conference that are confirmed so far include: Continue reading

2015 Workshops at Eastfield Village Announced


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Historic Eastfield VillageDespite the death of founder Donald G. Carpentier, a full slate of workshops and symposia are scheduled for Eastfield Village during the summer of 2015. Under the aegis of the non-profit Historic Eastfield Foundation, the 39th Annual Series of Early American Trades and Historic Preservation Workshops will offer education and hands-on training at the unique restoration village located in East Nassau, New York.

Beginning in June and running through August, the workshops will appeal to a wide range of students, including homeowners looking to deal with issues concerning historic home maintenance and restoration, as well as tradesmen, craftsmen, and museum personnel seeking to advance their knowledge and skills. Continue reading

Women’s History Month Plans At Women’s Rights NHP


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National Park Service NPSWomen’s Rights National Historical Park will be celebrating National Women’s History Month in March with an array of programming and special events. New exhibits will be unveiled featuring some of the park’s most significant historical objects related to the first Women’s Rights Convention held in the park’s Wesleyan Chapel in 1848.

Dr. Barbara LeSavoy, PhD, Director of Women and Gender Studies at The College of Brockport, will be sharing her experiences traveling in Russia in a lecture and conversation on women titled, “Comparative Perspectives on the United States and Russia.” And, WCNY will once again hold its Annual Central New York Women Who Make America Awards Ceremony at the park. These are just a sampling of the activities that will be on the park’s calendar during National Women’s History Month. Continue reading

MANY Statement On Cuomo Budget Plan


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MANY LogoThe Museum Association of New York (MANY), New York’s only state-wide membership association representing museums, historical societies, zoos, botanical gardens, and aquariums, said in a statement to the press that it views Governor Cuomo’s 2015-16 Executive Budget as “a good starting point for ongoing discussions about the value of museums and other similar institutions to the overall State’s economy and quality of life.” Continue reading

Historic Districts Council Announces Six To Celebrate


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Crown Heights North, BrooklynThe Historic Districts Council, New York’s city-wide advocate for historic buildings and neighborhoods, is pleased to announce its Six to Celebrate, an annual listing of historic New York City neighborhoods and institutions that merit preservation attention. They will be priorities for HDC’s advocacy and consultation over a yearlong period. This is New York’s only citywide list of preservation priorities coming directly from the neighborhoods.
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World War One Documentaries Being Screened


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Eastman Kodak Company adRecently rediscovered and digitally converted, The Oyster Bay Historical Society will have another viewing of the World War One documentaries found in it’s collection.

Originally distributed in 1919, these five short documentaries (total run time approximately 60 minutes) include scenes from battles in “No Man’s Land”, the U.S.S. Leviathan, the sinking of battleships by U-Boats, as well as the capture of German prisoners and Armistice Day celebrations. Continue reading

‘Live Free Or Die': The Life And Wars Of John Stark


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John Stark BiographyFew men contributed as much to the American victory in the Revolutionary War, yet have been as little recognized, as a New Hampshire farmer and lumberman by the name of John Stark. Although he is not well known outside of New Hampshire, a few words he wrote live on there today: Live Free or Die. A new biography by John F. Polhemus and Richard V. Polhemus, Stark, The Life and Wars of John Stark: French & Indian War Ranger, Revolutionary War General (Black Dome Press, 2014) should help bring this remarkable man’s life into appropriate perspective.

Stark served as a captain of rangers with Robert Rogers in the French and Indian War, and as a colonel and general in the Revolution at Bunker Hill, Trenton, Princeton, Westchester, Springfield, Saratoga, Ticonderoga and West Point. His greatest achievement however, was at the Battle of Bennington. The Battle of Saratoga and the surrender of Burgoyne on October 17, 1777 was the turning point of the American Revolution, but the Battle of Bennington on August 16th set the stage. Continue reading

New Book Considers Origins Of The Name Wyckoff


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Wyckoff Family HistoryIn What’s In A Name? History And Meaning Of Wyckoff (2014), M. William Wykoff offers evidence that the origin of the surname Wyckoff is Frisian and refers to a household or settlement on a bay, despite widespread belief of American descendants of Pieter Claessen Wyckoff that the name is Dutch.

Frisian was only one of the many languages spoken by early settlers of New Netherland. There are many spelling variants of the surname in the Northern Germanic linguistic area of Europe, Wykoff argues, but it now occurs principally in the Lower Saxony area of Germany which includes East Frisia from where Pieter Claessen Wyckoff emigrated. Continue reading

This Week’s New York History Web Highlights


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This Week’s Top New York History News


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Latest New York History News

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Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please make a small donation. Questions about contributions should be directed to editor John Warren.

Saranac: Life and Times of an Adirondack Town


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Clinton County Historical SocietyThe Clinton County Historical Association (CCHA) will open a new exhibit from 12 to 3 pm on Saturday, January 24th: Saranac: Life and Times of an Adirondack Town.  Since 2010, the CCHA has invited Clinton County Historians to take part in the Museum’s I Love Clinton County Exhibition Series.  The Town of Saranac is being highlighted in this year’s series focusing on town history.

Jan Couture, Town of Saranac Historian and the Seney family of the Saranac Family History and Research Group curated the exhibit which highlights Saranac’s history as a mining, manufacturing, logging and farming town. The exhibit which will be on display at the Museum until October 2015.  Continue reading

Poestenkill Lion: Unique Folk Art On Exhibit


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Poestenkill Lionk In December, the Rensselaer County Historical Society (RCHS) unveiled a new addition to the museum. The Poestenkill Lion returned to the museum after some conservation work and for the first time was displayed on the museum’s walls.

The lion first came to RCHS in 2011, when long-time RCHS supporters Hughes and Eva Gemmill donated the painting, which dates to about 1840 and is by an unknown artist. The lion was thinly painted with milk paint on four wide unfinished wood boards. Continue reading