At Boscobel: Spring Lecture Series on Federal Style


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Babscobel House Now“Boscobel is all about style, beauty and design,” claims Boscobel Executive Director, Steven Miller. “The elegance of its architecture, its immaculate collection of Federal period furnishings and its breathtaking gardens all come together to create the perfect venue for a series of lectures focused on Federal interior and exterior décor.”

Following tradition since 2002, the Friends of Boscobel will host a series of three lectures on Federal style.

Again this year, all talks will take place in the evening, inside the entry hall of the Boscobel mansion. Seating will be on stairs and chairs, and a wine and cheese reception will follow in the Carriage House where guests may chat with the speakers and purchase their books for signing.

Friends of Boscobel members receive free admission to the lectures. Admission for Non-Members is $20 per lecture. For a $20 savings, simply purchase an Individual Friends of Boscobel Membership for $40 and receive free admission to all three lectures. Memberships, reservations and tickets are all available at Boscobel.org.

Peter Koepke, The Design Library
Textile Design Over Time
Friday, May 2, 6-8pm

Like music or literature, textile design is an expression of its time. The patterns of printed cloth suggest a large pattern that contains them–what we may call the recycling wheel, which sets the motifs of textile designs on a circular road of eternal return. Nothing disappears, and nothing appears out of nowhere. Some designs have traveled extremely well across the centuries; we see examples of the re-incarnation of textile designs from the 1700s through the 21st century. For the lecture, actual swatches from the time of Jefferson and Franklin will be shown.

Peter Koepke is Owner/Director of The Design Library, the world’s largest and best organized collections of documentary fabrics, original paintings, wallpapers, embroideries and yarn dyes, numbering over seven million designs dating from the 1750s to the late 20th century.

Peter has fifteen years’ experience as a collector and dealer of South American art. He created seminal art collections in the 1970s and 80s for museums, universities, corporations and individuals throughout the United States, Europe, Australia and Japan. Peter now travels extensively in search of coveted collections to expand The Design Library’s archives. His curatorial expertise and connoisseurship have helped to create a leading design establishment.

Peter Pennoyer, Peter Pennoyer Architects
Fire and Ice: Houses in Peril and the Designs that Replace Them
Friday, May 23, 6-8pm

This lecture will tell the story of four commissions for houses in the Northeast that follow Peter Pennoyer’s dictum that the best place to build is where someone has chosen to build before you.

Peter Pennoyer and his partners have an award-winning international practice in classical and traditional architecture. The firm has built a substantial and varied body of work over the past twenty years and is recognized for uniting vigorous scholarship of architectural history with an inventive spirit and ability to reinterpret the classical language. A graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Pennoyer’s first independent commissions included designing Keith Haring’s Pop Shop on Lafayette Street and renovations to The Warhol Factory. Pennoyer and his partners would move on to master classical and traditional architecture in commissions ranging from the Mark Hotel to new houses across the country. Pennoyer is a trustee of The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, The Morgan Library & Museum, and the Whiting Foundation. With co-author Anne Walker, he has written four books: The Architecture of Delano & Aldrich, The Architecture of Warren & Wetmore, The Architecture of Grosvenor Atterbury, and The Architecture of Cross & Cross, published by The Monacelli Press in March 2014.

Page Dickey, Author, Designer & Gardener
Some of My Favorite Gardens and Why
Friday, June 20, 6-8pm

Page will show and describe a variety of private gardens in the United States and in Europe that especially appeal to her because of their strong sense of design, atmosphere or spirit of originality. She concludes with some pictures of her own garden, which is a favorite…merely because it is hers.

Page Dickey is a designer, an author, and, above all, a gardener. Her most recent book, Embroidered Ground, revisits her own garden, describing the pitfalls, challenges and pleasures in its creation over the last 33 years, about gardening with a husband, about the changes that come with aging. Previous books include Gardens in the Spirit of Place; the award-winning Breaking Ground: Portraits of Ten Garden Designers; Inside Out: Relating Garden to House; Duck Hill Journal: A Year in a Country Garden; Dogs in Their Gardens and Cats in Their Gardens. A contributor to numerous magazines over the years, she lectures across the country and is one of the founders of the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days program. Page lives and gardens with her husband in the company of assorted dogs, cats and chickens at Duck Hill in North Salem, New York.

Page will autograph her book, Embroidered Ground, at the reception. Books will be available for purchase in the Boscobel Gift Shop. Call ahead to reserve your copy: 845.265.3638, ask for Renate Smoller on extension 138. Or email rsmoller@boscobel.org.

Boscobel is located on scenic Route 9D in Garrison New York just one mile south of Cold Spring and directly across the river from West Point. From April through October, hours are 9:30am to 5pm (first tour at 10am; last at 4pm); November & December 9:30am to 4pm (last tour at 3pm).  Boscobel is open every day except Tuesdays, Thanksgiving and Christmas. For more information, visit Boscobel.org or call 845.265.3638.

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