Historians Podcast: Blighted Buildings Could Be Useful


By on

0 Comments

The Historians LogoThis week on The Historians podcast, Bob Cudmore and Dave Greene discuss a proposal to use blighted city buildings as a resource for new construction.

The idea was recently brought up in a letter to the editor by retired Montgomery County historian Jacqueline Mujrphy. Plus stories about World War II and the biography of Mary Van der Veer, an Amsterdam, NY, artist.

Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


By on

0 Comments

 

 

We’re still here, needing your help producing this weekly link list. You can do your part by making a contribution to keep The New York History Blog publishing.

Use the fundraising page at https://rally.org/f/5QOqoCY4K4U or send a check to: New York History Blog, 7269 State Route 9, Chestertown, NY 12817
Continue reading

Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Curriculum Offered


By on

0 Comments

Frederick DouglassTo celebrate the anniversary of Frederick Douglass’s 200th birthday, Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives has published a Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Curriculum.

Frederick Douglass was an African-American abolitionist, orator, writer, statesman, and social reformer. After escaping from slavery in Maryland he described his experiences in his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845). Continue reading

Exhibit Celebrates Utica’s Benita Denemark


By on

0 Comments

Denemark Family in the early 1950's- Be and Nathan Denemark, daughters Debrah and GaelThe Oneida County History Center has announced a new exhibit on Benita “Be” Denemark, one of Utica’s leading businesswomen during the middle 20th century, is set to start on Saturday, March 3rd at 1 pm.

This short term exhibit highlights Denemark’s accomplishments in the business community and her advocacy work in the realms of social justice and women’s equality. The exhibit will be introduced by Executive Director Brian Howard and includes remarks from Be’s family and friends.

The public is invited to share their memories and stories of Be following the opening remarks. Continue reading

Rockland History Podcast: Nyack Record Shop Project


By on

0 Comments

crossroads of rockland historyThis month on “Crossroads of Rockland History,” Clare Sheridan featured the Nyack Record Shop Project. The Nyack Record Shop Project is an important oral history collection effort directed by Bill Batson.

At Kiam Records, a tiny shop on Main Street in downtown Nyack, oral histories were gathered during one-on-one interviews in this ambitious effort to give a voice to a group whose history is often overlooked: the African American community. Continue reading

Colonial Port Cities and Slavery


By on

0 Comments

ben_franklins_worldThe histories of early North America and the Caribbean are intimately intertwined. The same European empires we encounter in our study of early America also appear in the Caribbean. The colonies of these respective empires often traded goods, people, and ideas between each other.

In this episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast, Marisa Fuentes, an associate professor of history and women and gender studies at Rutgers University and author of Dispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), joins us to explore some of the connections mainland North America and the British Caribbean shared in their practices of slavery in urban towns. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/173

Continue reading

Peterboro’s Peter Smith: Furs, Land, and Anguish


By on

0 Comments

Land Office CornueOn Saturday, March 3rd at 12:30 pm, Norm Dann will describe and sign his new book Peter Smith of Peterboro: Furs, Land, and Anguish at the Smithfield Community Center in Peterboro, Madison County, NY.

In the preface of his new book, Dann hypothesizes why there has not been a published biography. Also in the preface Dann explains that his intent of this work is to focus, not so much on what Smith did, but to examine the kind of person that Smith was and how that influenced what he did. Investigating Smith in this way presents him as a tragic figure in the classical sense. Continue reading