Wilderness to Woodstock: Unique Catskills History Film Showing


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Williams house neversink (1893)The Time and the Valleys Museum will show a film on the history of the Catskill resorts from 1823 to 1974 on Sunday, October 22 at 2 p.m. on St. Rt. 55 in Grahamsville.

This story of the Catskill resorts from 1823 to 1974 was originally a slide presentation by Manville Wakefield, and narrated by Miles Ellison.

The Catskills have been a popular vacation area since the early 1800’s for famous artists and New Yorkers. Continue reading

Explore Family History in Canton October 21st


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silas write houseA series of six lectures will be featured at the upcoming Local History and Genealogy Fair being held at the SLCHA Museum and Archives, 3 East Main Street, Canton from 10 am to 4 pm on Saturday, October 21. The schedule will include topics which should be of interest to both local history and genealogical researchers.

At 10 am, a panel of local researchers will hold a round table discussion on Beginning to Research Your Family Tree; at 11 am, a presentation will be held by a representative of Witherbee & Whalen, Canton, on cleaning and repairing cemetery monuments as well as a look at that firm’s history in Canton; at noon, Town Historian and Registrar will talk about the role of those offices to assist researchers looking for information on their ancestors; at 1 pm, Chuck Henry of the NNYLN will explain research methods using the New York State Historic Newspapers website; at 2 pm, a workshop will be held on Internet Genealogy and doing online research, led by an experienced local researcher; and at 3 pm, a discussion of the recent interest in DNA tests and their role in genealogy will be held. Continue reading

Votes for Women Exhibit Opens Nov 4th at State Museum


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votes for women exhibitA new exhibit, Votes for Women: Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial will open at the New York State Museum on Saturday, November 4.

Votes for Women will celebrate the centennial of women’s suffrage in New York State and seeks to raise public awareness of the struggle for women’s suffrage and equal rights in New York State from the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention through 1917 when New York State granted women the right to vote.

The exhibition will also address the nationally significant role of New York State leaders in regards to women’s rights and the feminist movement through the early 21st century. Continue reading

Pauline Maier’s American Revolution


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ben_franklins_worldHow much can the work of one historian impact how we view and study the American Revolution?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we investigate the answer to this question by exploring the life and work of Pauline Maier, a historian who spent her life researching and investigating the American Revolution. Over the course of her lifetime, Maier wrote four important books about the American Revolution: From Resistance to Revolution (Knopf, 1973), The Old Revolutionaries (Knopf, 1980), American Scripture (Knopf, 1997), and Ratification (Simon & Schuster, 2010).

Mary Beth Norton, Joanne Freeman, Todd Estes, and Lindsay Chervinsky join us as we journey through Maier’s body of work to better understand the American Revolution and how one historian can impact how we view and study history. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/155

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People of Colonial Albany Presentation in Colonie Oct 22nd


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Stefan BielinskiThe Historical Society of the Town of Colonie has announced that Stefan Bielinski, founder and long-time director of the NY State Museum’s Colonial Albany Social History Project, will present his musical and visual introduction about the people of Colonial Albany at the Town of Colonie’s William K. Sanford Library, 629 Albany Shaker Road on Sunday, October 22 at 2 pm. Continue reading

Immigrants Are Our History: So What Do We Do Now?


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Spending so much time conducting research in old books and newspapers, I’m often left shaking my head when today’s news headlines call to mind a favorite saying: “Those who don’t know history are condemned to repeat it.” We use the concept all the time for personal decisions.

Before making a purchase — car, washing machine, cable package, cell phone — have you ever referred to a magazine like Consumer Reports, read online reviews, or asked a friend how their own choice worked out? If so, you checked with history to avoid making a poor choice. It’s a simple concept: learn a product’s history and you’re not doomed to repeat it. Continue reading

International Archaeology Day at Oneida Mansion House


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oneida community mansion houseOn Saturday, October 21 at 10:30 am the Oneida Community Mansion House will host International Archaeology Day as they search for evidence of past lives in the landscape surrounding the Mansion House.

The Oneida Community (1848-1880) built a communal home consisting of dozens of buildings and hundreds of acres of land, which they used to support their specific ways of life, work, and thought. International Archaeology Day will seek out evidence of those past uses and try to locate built evidence to re-imagine how life was lived by the Oneida Community, its regional antecedents and descendants.  Continue reading

Abolition Hall of Fame Weekend Planned


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2016 Induction Webber Stewart LandThe National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum (NAHOF) commemoration ceremonies for the 2016 inductees will be held Saturday, October 21, 2017 at NAHOF, 5255 Pleasant Valley Road, Peterboro NY.

The inductees are Rev. John Gregg Fee, Beriah Green, Angelina Grimké, and James W.C. Pennington. This is the last year of the two year induction-commemoration cycle. Beginning in 2018 inductions and commemorations will be completed in one year.

At 3 on Saturday, October 21 Christopher L. Webber, who nominated Pennington to the Hall of Fame, will present James W.C. Pennington: Pastor and Abolitionist for the Abolition Symposia. Webber, the author of American to the Backbone: The Journey of James W.C. Pennington from Slavery to World Leader, will use his research to present Pennington’s remarkable story. Pennington was born in slavery in Maryland in 1808. At the age of 19, scared and illiterate, James escaped from slavery. Moving finally to Brooklyn he found work as a carriage man and took advantage of night schools. In 1829 Pennington participated in the first Negro National Convention of which he became the presiding officer in 1853. Pennington served congregations in Long Island, Hartford, and Manhattan and traveled three times to England, Scotland, and the continent of Europe as an anti-slavery advocate. He was so respected by European audiences that the University of Heidelberg awarded him an honorary doctorate, making him the first person of African descent to receive such a degree.  Pennington was accepted as the first black student at the Yale Divinity School and was accepted for ordination in the Congregational Church. April 26, 2014 Yale University celebrated the opening of the James W.C. Pennington Christian Ministry Center. Continue reading

William Seward’s and Horatio Seymour’s Gettysburg Addresses


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The dedication of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on November 19, 1863, is mostly remembered for the short speech that President Abraham Lincoln delivered there that day. At the time, however, most of the public attention went to a much longer, formal oration by Edward Everett, former Massachusetts governor, U.S. Senator and Secretary of State.

But there were other speakers at Gettysburg as well, including two New Yorkers, Secretary of State (and former U.S. Senator and governor) William H. Seward, and Governor Horatio Seymour.

At the time, Seward and Seymour were nationally recognized and influential leaders and their short speeches were widely noted and reprinted in the press. Continue reading

Fly-in Breakfasts At Empire State Aerosciences Museum


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Grumman F-14 Tomcat The Empire State Aerosciences Museum will be hosting its monthly all you can eat breakfast on Saturday October 21 from 8:30 to 10:30 am at 250 Rudy Chase Drive, in Glenville, NY.

The Empire State Aerosciences Museum is located at the Schenectady County Airport in the Town of Glenville, at the site of the former General Electric Flight Test Center. Dedicated to interpreting aviation, particularly as related to New York State, the museum offers visitors a variety of educational experiences, including interpretive exhibits, a collection of restored aircraft, the State’s largest aviation library and an airpark with over 20 aircraft.

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