David Brooks: A Canal for the Adirondacks


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The Historians LogoThis week on The Historians Podcast, David Brooks describes unfulfilled plans to build a canal linking the Erie Canal with Johnstown, Gloversville and the Sacandaga Valley in the Adirondacks.

The story first appeared as an article in The New York History Blog. Brooks is education coordinator at a state Erie Canal history site, Schoharie Crossing in Fort Hunter.

Listen to the podcast here.     Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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Are you glad to see this weekly link list? Do your part my making a contribution to keep the New York History publishing. Use the fundraising page at https://rally.org/f/5QOqoCY4K4U or send a check to: New York History Blog, 7269 State Route 9, Chestertown, NY 12817
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New Online Reporting System For Local Historians


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office of state history§57.09 of the NYS Arts and Cultural Affairs Law requires all appointed Local Government Historians to “make an annual report, in the month of January, to the local appointing officer or officers and to the state historian of the work which has been accomplished during the preceding year.”

New York State Historian Devin Lander and the Office of State History have made online submission of the required report available to allow historians to more easily make their required report via the web.

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Niagara County ‘Tuscarora Heroes’ Commemoration Dec 19th


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Tuscarora HeroesDecember 19, 2017 marks the 204th Anniversary of the “Tuscarora Heroes.” Near Niagara Falls, in retaliation for the American forces burning the British held Canadian town of Newark (now Niagara-on-the-Lake) and Fort George ) during the War of 1812, British-Canadian forces and their First Nations allies captured Fort Niagara and attacked the poorly defended Town of Lewiston.

Though a number of civilians were killed during the burning of Lewiston, many more were saved by the actions of warriors from the nearby Tuscarora village who rushed to their aid. Creating a diversion long enough for many civilians to escape, the actions of the “Tuscarora Heroes” has become an important part of Lewiston’s history and shared memory. Continue reading

Saratoga History Being Featured On C-SPAN


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A crew from C-SPAN, the cable channel that covers government proceedings and public affairs, visited Saratoga Springs, New York, in late September 2017.

In addition to speaking with various community leaders, C-SPAN producers talked to horse trainer H. James Bond, outrider Natalie Rutigliano, and jockey Robbie Davis while it toured the Oklahoma Training Track and the facilities at the historic Saratoga Racetrack.

C-SPAN’s Local Content Vehicle also stopped by several other local sites, including Congress Park, the Saratoga Battlefield in Stillwater, and Grant’s Cottage in Wilton. Continue reading

The American Revolution in North America


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ben_franklins_worldWhen we think about North America during the American Revolution, most of our brains show us images of eastern Canada and the thirteen British American colonies that waged a revolution and war for independence against Great Britain.

But what about the rest of the North American continent? What about the areas that we know today as the midwest, the Great Plains, the southwest, the west, and the Pacific Northwest? What about Alaska? What went on in these areas during the American Revolution?

What did the American Revolution look like through the eyes of Native American peoples?

In this episode of Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History, we explore what the American Revolution looked like within the larger context of North American history with historians Claudio Saunt and Alyssa Mt. Pleasant. You can listen to the podcast here: www.benfranklinsworld.com/163

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Former NYS Historical Assn President Responds To Criticisms


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New York State Historical AssociationI recently reported on a petition initiated by the New York Academy of History in support of local and state history.

Much of the details of the letter were against recent actions of the New York State Historical Association (NYSHA), an organization that has undergone some changes in 2017 as reported in New York History Blog by editor John Warren and columnist/advocate Bruce Dearstyne.

My post led to a response by Paul S. D’Ambrosio, President & CEO, Fenimore Art Museum & The Farmers’ Museum aka NYSHA. He sent me an email asking if I would publish it. I agreed to do so and he then sent a second draft which is published below. Continue reading

Roosevelt Island: NYC Art Deco Lecture Thursday


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new york art deco bookRoosevelt Island Library has announced they will host an art deco lecture on Thursday, December 14 at 6:30 pm.

“Art Deco Metropolis: Magnificent Buildings of Modern New York City” will be led by noted architectural historian and author Anthony W. Robins.

Mr. Robins is the author of three books on New York City architecture, including New York Art Deco: A Guide to Gotham’s Jazz Age Architecture. A Q & A and a book signing will follow the lecture. Continue reading

Winterthur Museum, Library Seeks Research Fellows


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Winterthur library booksWinterthur Museum, Garden and Library in Wilmington, Delaware has invited scholars, graduate students, artists, and craftspeople to apply to submit applications to the 2018-2019 Research Fellowships.

Fellowships include a 4-month postdoctoral fellowship, 1–2 semester dissertation fellowships, and 1–3 month short-term fellowships.

Winterthur is once again offering short-term “Maker-Creator” Fellowships. These short-term fellowships are designed for artists, writers, filmmakers, horticulturalists, craftspeople, and others who wish to examine, study, and immerse themselves in Winterthur’s vast collections in order to inspire creative and artistic works for general audiences. Continue reading

Making History Public: A Virginia Example


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New York has many programs that promote public interest in, and understanding of, history. Their initiatives and accomplishments are often reported here on the New York History Blog. But readers of the Blog might be interested in taking a look at the work of Virginia historian Edward Ayers, former president of the University of Richmond where he now teaches history, as another example of how to deepen public understanding of history and bring history into public discussions.

Ayers established the new online site, BUNK HISTORY, profiled in this recent post here on the New York History Blog. The site features articles from the press and web sources presenting historical perspectives on current events. Continue reading