Why New York Fought the Civil War


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recruitsWe will celebrate Presidents’ Day next month, on February 20. But we don’t celebrate Governors’ Day or anything similar. If we did, we might note the contributions of New York’s three Civil War governors — Edwin Morgan (R, 1859-1863) Horatio Seymour (D, 1863-1865) and Reuben Fenton (R, 1865-1869). All three were nationally known leaders at the time. Seymour was a critic of the wartime draft and other Lincoln administration domestic policies. Morgan and Fenton both went on to become United States Senators from our state, where they also played leadership roles. Seymour ran for president in 1868, losing to Ulysses S. Grant. Continue reading

Redcoats, Hessians, and Americans in the Battles of Saratoga


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redcoats-hessians-and-americansThe American Revolution Round Table (ARRT) of the Hudson and Mohawk Valleys will present Redcoats, Hessians, and Americans fought in the 1777 Battles of Saratoga on Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 6:30 pm, at the Schuylerville Town Hall, 12 Spring St. (corner of Route 29 & 4, the old High School), Schuylerville.

This is the second session held by the ARRT where time will be allocated to networking, socializing and to discuss prior topics. Continue reading

Buffalo’s Dug’s Dive Riot of 1863


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dugs-dive-buffaloNot much has been written about this civil disturbance that occurred on the afternoon of August 12, 1862 when Irish and German stevedores protested against local dock bosses, demanding increased pay for their work, and preventing others from working however when police responded the rioters overpowered them and Chief Dullard and other members of the force injured.

Ultimately the police regained control of the situation with gunfire wounding two rioters and arresting the ring leaders. Continue reading

Sponsorships Available for 2017 Canal Related Events


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a-boat-exits-lock-2-on-the-erie-canal-in-waterfordThe Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor, in partnership with the NYS Canal Corporation, is offering a limited number sponsorships up to $500 for events or festivals taking place in the National Heritage Corridor from May through November 2017.

Qualifying events must promote or celebrate the distinctive historic, cultural, scenic, or recreational resources of the canal corridor. Continue reading

24 New National Historic Landmarks Named


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department-of-interiorAs the National Park Service enters its second century of service, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced the designation of 24 new National Historic Landmarks.

The National Historic Landmarks Program recognizes historic properties of exceptional value to the nation and promotes the preservation efforts of federal, state, and local agencies and Native American tribes, as well as those of private organizations and individuals. The program is one of more than a dozen administered by the National Park Service that provide states and local communities technical assistance, recognition and funding to help preserve our nation’s shared history, and create close-to-home recreation opportunities. Continue reading

Kerry James Marshall: The Master is Present


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School of Beauty, School of Culture, 2012. Kerry James MarshallKerry James Marshall, at the Met Breuer exhibition until January 29, boldly claims center stage in American art with his show entitled “Mastry.” A Chicago-based painter, Marshall seizes the spotlight at the center of conversations about American art at the center of the country’s art scene in New York. His mastery unfurls over a grand expanse of work, complemented by his own selections from the Metropolitan Museum’s collections, a curated sidebar that testifies to his confident deployment of art history in his own work. History, genre, cityscape, portrait – Marshall draws from the visual riches of the past, transforming Western art traditions into his own language. His cityscapes suggest how his paintings reclaim space.  Continue reading

Laurence Hauptman On Chief Chapman Scanandoah


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an-oneida-indian-in-foreign-watersProfessor Laurence M. Hauptman joined host Jane E. Wilcox on the latest Forget-Me-Not Hour podcast to discuss the history of the Iroquois Confederacy in Central and Western New York and his latest book, An Oneida Indian in Foreign Waters: The Life of Chief Chapman Scanandoah 1870-1953.

Hauptman told the story of Chief Chapman Scanandoah, gave tips for researching the Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, Seneca and Tuscarora, as well as discussed the status of Iroquois treaties and land claims. Larry also talked about his inspiration for writing numerous books on the Iroquois. Listen to the podcast here. Continue reading

New York History Around The Web This Week


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